Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “same”

See all translations

same

adjective uk   /seɪm/ us  

same adjective (EXACTLY LIKE)

the same
More examples
A1 exactly like another or each other: My twin sister and I have the same nose. She was wearing exactly the same dress as I was. Hilary's the same age as me. She brought up her children in just (= exactly) the same way her mother did.
Compare

same adjective (NOT ANOTHER)

A1 [before noun] not another different place, time, situation, person, or thing: My brother and I sleep in the same room. Rachel's still going out with the same boyfriend. That (very) same day, he heard he'd passed his exam. I would do the same thing again if I had the chance. They eat at the same restaurant every week. Shall we meet up at the same time tomorrow?
More examples

same

pronoun uk   /seɪm/ us  

same pronoun (EXACTLY LIKE)

the same as A2 exactly like: People say I look just the same as my sister. John thinks the same as I do - it's just too expensive.the same B2 not changed: After all these years you look exactly the same - you haven't changed a bit. Charles is just the same as always.

same pronoun (NOT ANOTHER)

the same B1 not another different thing or situation: I'm hopeless at physics, and it's the same with chemistry - I get it all wrong. [before noun] humorous not another different person: "Was that Marion on the phone?" "The (very) same."

same

Translations of “same”
in Spanish parecido, mismo, igual…
in French semblable, même…
in German gleich…
in Chinese (Simplified) 非常相似…
in Chinese (Traditional) 非常相似…
(Definition of same from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of same?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “same” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

white Christmas

a Christmas when it snows

Word of the Day

Cleavage proves divisive in Cambridge’s words of 2014

by Alastair Horne,
December 19, 2014
​​​​ Other dictionaries may choose faddish novelties as their words of the year, but here at Cambridge, we like to do something different. We look for the words that have seen sudden surges in searches over the course of the year – words that have been baffling users of English and driven them

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More