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English definition of “scan”

scan

verb uk   /skæn/ (-nn-) us  

scan verb (LOOK)

C2 [T] to look at something carefully, with the eyes or with a machine, in order to get information: She anxiously scanned the faces of the men leaving the train. Doug scanned the horizon for any sign of the boat. C1 [I + adv/prep, T] to look through a text quickly in order to find a piece of information that you want or to get a general idea of what the text contains: I scanned through the booklet but couldn't find the address. Scan the newspaper article quickly and make a note of the main points.

scan verb (MAKE PICTURE)

C1 [I or T] to use a machine to put a picture of a document into a computer, or to take a picture of the inside of something: I'll just scan the article into the computer. Volunteers' brains were scanned while they looked at the pictures. All hand luggage has to be scanned.

scan verb (POEM)

[I] specialized literature If a poem or part of a poem scans, it follows a pattern of regular beats: This line doesn't scan - it's got too many syllables.

scan

noun uk   /skæn/ us  
[S] a careful or quick look through something: I gave the book a quick scan, and decided not to buy it. C2 [C] a medical examination in which an image of the inside of the body is made using a special machine: to do a brain scan to have an ultrasound scan
(Definition of scan from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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