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English definition of “scene”

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scene

noun uk   /siːn/ us  

scene noun (THEATRE/FILM)

B1 [C] a part of a play or film in which the action stays in one place for a continuous period of time: the funeral/wedding scene nude/sex scenes Juliet dies in Act IV, Scene iii.
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scene noun (VIEW)

B2 [C] a view or picture of a place, event, or activity: Lowry painted street scenes. scenes of everyday life figurative There were scenes of great joy as the hostages were re-united with their families.
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scene noun (PLACE)

B2 [C usually singular] a place where an unpleasant event has happened: The police arrived to find a scene of horrifying destruction. Evidence was found at the scene of the crime.
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scene noun (AREA)

B2 [S] a particular area of activity and all the people or things connected with it: the pop/political/drugs/gay scene Rap music arrived/came/appeared on the scene in the early 1980s. informal I'd rather go to a jazz concert - I'm afraid opera isn't really my scene (= is not the type of thing I like).
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scene noun (ARGUMENT)

C2 [C] an expression of great anger or similar feelings, often between two people, or an occasion when this happens: Please don't make a scene. There was a terrible scene and Jayne ended up in tears.
(Definition of scene from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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