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English definition of “scramble”

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scramble

verb uk   /ˈskræm.bl̩/ us  

scramble verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

C2 [I usually + adv/prep] to move or climb quickly but with difficulty, often using your hands to help you: She scrambled up the steep hillside and over the rocks. He scrambled into his clothes (= put them on quickly) and raced to fetch a doctor. As the burning plane landed, the terrified passengers scrambled for the door (= tried to reach the door quickly). [I] to compete with other people for something there is very little of: [+ to infinitive] People are scrambling to buy property before prices rise even further.
More examples

scramble verb (CHANGE SIGNAL)

[T] to change a radio or phone signal so that it can only be understood using a special device

scramble verb (TAKE OFF)

[I or T] specialized military to (cause a plane to) take off very quickly: A helicopter was scrambled within minutes of the news.

scramble verb (MIX)

[T] to mix eggs with a little milk and mix again as they are being fried

scramble

noun uk   /ˈskræm.bl̩/ us  

scramble noun (CLIMBING)

[S] a climb that is difficult so that you have to use your hands to help you: It was a real scramble to the top of the hillside. [S] an act of hurrying: [+ to infinitive] As soon as the plane landed there was a mad/wild scramble to get out.

scramble noun (QUICK MOVEMENT)

[S] a hurried attempt to get something: After the death of the dictator there was an unseemly scramble for power among the generals.

scramble noun (SPORT)

[C] a motocross event: We're planning a scramble through the forest next weekend.
(Definition of scramble from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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