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English definition of “scrape”

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scrape

verb uk   /skreɪp/ us  

scrape verb (REMOVE)

[T] to remove an unwanted covering or a top layer from something, especially using a sharp edge or something rough: [+ obj + adj ] Scrape your boots clean before you come in. We'll have to scrape the snow off the car before we go out in it. Emily scraped away the dead leaves to reveal the tiny shoot of a new plant.

scrape verb (RUB)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to (cause to) rub against a surface so that slight damage or an unpleasant noise is produced: Jackie fell over and scraped her knee (on the pavement). I was woken up by the noise of branches scraping against my bedroom window.

scrape verb (SUCCEED)

[I usually + adv/prep] to succeed in getting or achieving something, but only just or with great difficulty: She scraped into university on very low grades.

scrape

noun uk   /skreɪp/ us  

scrape noun (SITUATION)

[C] informal a difficult or slightly dangerous situation that you cause by your own silly behaviour: She's always getting into silly scrapes - I do wish she'd think before she does things. He had a couple of scrapes with the police and ended up in court.

scrape noun (RUB)

[C or U] a slight injury or an unpleasant noise produced by rubbing against a surface: "It's just a scrape," said the boy looking down at his bleeding knee. I hate the scrape of chalk on a blackboard.
(Definition of scrape from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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