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English definition of “see”

see

verb (USE EYES)    /siː/ (present participle seeing, past tense saw, past participle seen)
A1 [I or T] to be conscious of what is around you by using your eyes : Turn the light on so I can see. I can see you! [+ (that)] The teacher could see (that) the children had been fighting . [+ infinitive without to] Jacqui saw the car drive up outside the police station . [+ -ing verb] From the window we could see the children play ing in the yard . [+ past participle] His parents saw him award ed the winner's medal . See (= look at) p. 23 for prices and flight details . See over (= look at the next page ) for further information .Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptive A2 [T] to watch a film , television programme , etc.: Did you see that documentary on Channel 4 last night ?Using the eyesEyesight, glasses and lensesThe eye and surrounding areaPerceptive C1 [T often passive] to be the time or place when something happens : This summer has seen the end of water restrictions in the area thanks to a new reservoir .Experiencing and suffering you ain't seen nothing yet humorous said to mean that more surprising or exciting things are likely to happen Experiencing and suffering Grammar:Hear, see, etc. + object + infinitive or -ingWe can use either the infinitive without to or the -ing form after the object of verbs such as hear, see, notice, watch. The infinitive without to often emphasises the whole action or event which someone hears or sees. The -ing form usually emphasises an action or event which is in progress or not yet completed.Grammar:Look at, see or watch?Grammar:Look atWhen we look at something, we direct our eyes in its direction and pay attention to it:Grammar:SeeSee means noticing something using our eyes. The past simple form is saw and the -ed form is seen:Grammar:Watch as a verbWatch is similar to look at, but it usually means that we look at something for a period of time, especially something that is changing or moving:Grammar:Look at, see or watch: typical errorsGrammar:SeeWe use the verb see to talk about using our eyes to be aware of what is around us:
(Definition of see verb (USE EYES) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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