send definition, meaning - what is send in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “send”

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send

verb [T] uk   us   /send/ (sent, sent)

send verb [T] (POST/EMAIL)

A1 to cause something to go from one place to another, especially by post or email: [+ two objects] I'll send her a letter/email/parcel/postcard next week. We'll send it by post/airmail/sea. Could you send a reply to them as quickly as possible? The news report was sent by satellite. She sent a message with John to say that she couldn't come. They sent her flowers for her birthday. Maggie sends her love and hopes you'll feel better soon.
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send verb [T] (CAUSE TO GO)

B2 to cause or order someone to go and do something: [+ to infinitive] We're sending the children to stay with my parents for a couple of weeks. The commander has asked us to send reinforcements. They've sent their son (away) to school in Scotland. He was trying to explain but she became impatient and sent him away (= told him to leave).
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send verb [T] (CAUSE TO HAPPEN)

C2 to cause someone or something to do a particular thing, or to cause something to happen: The explosion sent the crowd into a panic. Watching the television always sends me to sleep. [+ adj] UK His untidiness sends her crazy/mad/wild. [+ -ing verb] The announcement of the fall in profits sent the company's share price plummeting (= caused it to go down a lot). The draught from the fan sent papers flying all over the room.
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(Definition of send from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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