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English definition of “shit”

shit

noun uk   /ʃɪt/ us  
[U] offensive the solid waste that is released from the bowels of a person or animal: There's so much dog shit on the pavement.
Synonym
See also
[S] offensive the act of releasing solid waste from the bowels: to have (US take) a shit. the shits [plural] offensive diarrhoea (= a medical condition in which the contents of the bowels are passed out of the body too often): Something I ate has given me the shits. [ U] offensive nonsense, or something of low quality: She talks a load of shit. [C] offensive an unpleasant person who behaves badly: The man's a complete shit. [U] offensive insults, criticism, or unkind or unfair treatment: Ben gets a lot of shit from his parents about the way he dresses. Jackie doesn't take (any) shit from anyone (= does not allow anyone to treat her badly). [U] US offensive used in negatives to mean "anything": He doesn't know shit about what's going on.

shit

verb uk   /ʃɪt/ (present participle shitting, past tense and past participle shit, shat or shitted) offensive us  
[I] to pass solid waste from the bowels: That dog had better not shit in the house again!mainly US I need to shit real bad. shit yourself to be extremely frightened: She was shitting herself, especially when he pulled out a gun.
Phrasal verbs

shit

exclamation uk   /ʃɪt/ offensive us  
used to express anger or surprise: Oh shit, we're going to be late! Shit - the damn thing's broken!
(Definition of shit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of shit?
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