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English definition of “shock”

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shock

noun uk   /ʃɒk/ us    /ʃɑːk/

shock noun (SURPRISE)

B1 [C or U] (the emotional or physical reaction to) a sudden, unexpected, and usually unpleasant event or experience: Her mother's death came as a great shock - it was so unexpected. It was such a loud crash - it gave me/I got quite a shock. It was a shock to see her looking so ill. I was in (a state of) shock for about two weeks after the accident. UK The French suffered a shock defeat (= completely unexpected defeat) by the Italian side at the weekend.a shock to the system an unpleasant feeling that you experience when something new or unusual happens: It's really hard getting back to work after three months off - it's quite a shock to the system.
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shock noun (ELECTRICITY)

C2 [C] an electric shock : Ow! - I got a shock from that lamp!

shock noun (ILLNESS)

[U] a medical condition caused by severe injury, pain, loss of blood, or fear that slows down the flow of blood around the body: Several passengers from the wrecked vehicle were taken to hospital suffering from shock.

shock noun (DAMAGING EFFECT)

C2 [U] the effect of one object violently hitting another, which might cause damage or a slight movement: For running on hard roads, you need shoes with extra cushioning to absorb (= reduce) the shock.

shock noun (OFFENDED)

[U] a feeling of being offended or upset by something you consider wrong or unacceptable: You should have seen the look of shock on her face when he started swearing!

shock noun (HAIR)

[S] a large and noticeable mass of hair: She's got a shock of bright red hair.

shock

verb [I or T] uk   /ʃɒk/ us    /ʃɑːk/

shock verb [I or T] (OFFEND)

B2 to offend or upset someone by doing or saying something that they consider is immoral or unacceptable: The advertisements were designed to shock - that was the whole point of the campaign. [+ obj + to infinitive ] I think it shocks him to hear women talking about sex.
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shock verb [I or T] (SURPRISE)

B2 to make someone feel upset or surprised: The photographs of starving children shocked people into giving money. The news of the accident shocked the family deeply.
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shockable
adjective uk   /ˈʃɒk.ə.bl̩/ us    /ˈʃɑː.kə-/
I have to be careful what I say to my mother - she's very shockable (= easily offended).
shocked
adjective uk   /ʃɒkt/ us    /ʃɑːkt/
B1 After his announcement, there was a shocked silence. [+ to infinitive] We were shocked to see smoke pouring out of the roof.
(Definition of shock from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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