shoot Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "shoot" - English Dictionary

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shootverb

uk   us   /ʃuːt/ (shot, shot)

shoot verb (WEAPON)

B1 [I or T] to fire a bullet or an arrow, or to hit, injure, or kill a person or animal by firing a bullet or arrow at him, her, or it: If he's not armed, don't shoot. The kids were shooting arrows at a target. She was shot three times in the head. He has a licence to shoot pheasants on the farmer's land. [+ obj + adj ] A policeman was shot dead in the city centre last night. The troops were told to shoot to kill.
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shoot verb (SPORT)

B1 [I] to try to score points for yourself or your team, in sports involving a ball, by kicking, hitting, or throwing the ball towards the goal: He shot from the middle of the field and still managed to score.shoot baskets/hoops US informal to play basketball
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shoot verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

C2 [I usually + adv/prep] to move in a particular direction very quickly and directly: She shot past me several metres before the finishing line. He shot out of the office a minute ago - I think he was late for a meeting. They were just shooting off to town so we didn't stop to speak. Sylvester Stallone shot to fame (= became famous suddenly) with the movie "Rocky". [T] to move through or past something quickly: informal He shot three sets of traffic lights (= went past them when they gave the signal to stop) before the police caught him. It was so exhilarating shooting the rapids (= travelling through the part of a river where the water flows dangerously fast).
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shoot verb (FILM)

C1 [I or T] to use a camera to record a video or take a photograph: We shot four reels of film in Egypt. The movie was shot on location in Southern India.
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shoot verb (PLAY)

[T] mainly US informal to play a game of pool or craps

shoot verb (DRUG)

[T] slang to take an illegal drug by injecting yourself with it: By the time he was 16, he was shooting heroin twice a day.
shooter
noun [C] uk   /ˈʃuː.tər/  us   /-t̬ɚ/
He's thought to be the best shooter in the league.

shootnoun

uk   us   /ʃuːt/

shoot noun (PLANT)

[C] the first part of a plant to appear above the ground as it develops from a seed, or any new growth on an already existing plant: Two weeks after we'd planted the seeds, little green shoots started to appear.figurative The first green shoots (= hopeful signs) of economic recovery have started to appear.

shoot noun (PHOTOGRAPHS)

[C usually singular] an occasion when photographers take a series of photographs, usually of the same person or people in the same place: We did a fashion shoot on the beach, with the girls modelling swimwear.

shoot noun (WEAPON)

[C] an occasion on which a group of people go to an area of the countryside to shoot animals

shootexclamation

uk   us   /ʃuːt/ informal
used to tell someone that they should speak: "Dad, I need to talk to you." "Shoot."
(Definition of shoot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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