shove definition, meaning - what is shove in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “shove”

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shove

verb uk   us   /ʃʌv/

shove verb (PUSH)

[I or T] to push someone or something forcefully: She was jostled and shoved by an angry crowd as she left the court. Just wait your turn - there's no need to shove. Reporters pushed and shoved as they tried to get close to the princess.

shove verb (PUT)

[T + adv/prep] informal to put something somewhere in a hurried or careless way: I'll just shove this laundry in the washer before we go out. "Where should I put this suitcase?" "Shove it down there for the moment." They can't just shove motorways anywhere they like, you know.

shove verb (MOVE BODY)

[I + adv/prep] informal to move your body to make space for someone else: Shove over/along, Lena, and make some room for me.UK Why don't you shove up so that Fatima can sit next to you?
Idioms

shove

noun [C] uk   us   /ʃʌv/
the action of shoving someone or something: Would you help me give the piano a shove?
Translations of “shove”
in Arabic يَدفَع بِقوّة…
in Korean 밀치다…
in Malaysian menolak…
in French enfoncer, pousser…
in Turkish itmek, itip kakmak…
in Italian spingere (bruscamente)…
in Chinese (Traditional) 推, 推,推擠,推撞…
in Russian толкать, пихать…
in Polish pchać, popychać…
in Vietnamese xô đẩy…
in Spanish empujar…
in Portuguese empurrar, apertar…
in Thai ดัน…
in German schieben, stoßen…
in Catalan empènyer bruscament…
in Japanese ~をぐいっと押す, 押しのける…
in Indonesian menyorongkan, mendorongkan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 推, 推,推挤,推撞…
(Definition of shove from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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