shred Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "shred" - English Dictionary

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shrednoun

uk   us   /ʃred/

shred noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

[S] a very small amount of something: There's still a shred of hope that a peace agreement can be reached. There isn't a shred of evidence to support her accusation.

shred noun (CUT)

[C usually plural] a very small, thin piece that has been torn from something: Cut the radishes into shreds to garnish the platesin shreds very badly torn: My shirt was in shreds when I took it out of the washer. badly damaged: The report has left the prison governor's reputation in shreds.

shredverb [T]

uk   us   /ʃred/ (-dd-)
to cut or tear something roughly into thin strips: Shred the lettuce and arrange it around the edge of the dish. shredded carrot/paper to destroy a document by tearing it into strips, especially in a machine: He ordered his secretary to shred important documents when government inspectors started investigating his business affairs.
Translations of “shred”
in Arabic قِطْعة صَغيرة…
in Korean 가는 조각…
in Malaysian carikan, cebisan…
in French lambeau…
in Turkish parça, lime, dilim…
in Italian brandello, pezzetto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 少量, 極少量,微量…
in Russian клочок…
in Polish strzęp…
in Vietnamese miếng nhỏ…
in Spanish triza, jirón…
in Portuguese tira…
in Thai ชิ้นเล็กชิ้นน้อย…
in German der Fetzen…
in Catalan tira, parrac…
in Japanese 破片, 断片…
in Indonesian carikan, robekan, cabikan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 少量, 极少量,微量…
(Definition of shred from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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