sight Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "sight" - English Dictionary

See all translations

sightnoun

uk   us   /saɪt/

sight noun (ABILITY TO SEE)

B1 [U] the ability to see: If your sight is poor, you should not drive a car. The old woman has lost her sight (= has become blind).
See also
More examples

sight noun (VIEW)

B2 [C or S or U] something that is in someone's view: The flowers at the annual flower show were a beautiful sight. You should always keep sight of your bags (= have them where you can see them) while you're at the airport.informal You can't go out in those clothes - you look a real sight (= look untidy or silly)! The child laughed at the sight of (= when she saw) the clockwork toy.formal The lawyer requested sight of (= to see) the papers. I dare not let the children out of my sight (= go where I cannot see them) in this park. The police officer was hidden out of sight (= where he could not be seen) behind a tree. The castle came into sight (= started to be able to be seen) as we went round a bend in the road. We're looking for a house which is within sight of (= from which it is possible to see) the mountains.figurative After three years of campaigning, the end is finally in sight (= will happen soon) for Jon. I caught sight of (= saw for a moment) my former teacher while I was out shopping today, but she turned a corner and I lost sight of (= could no longer see) her. "Do you know David Wilson?" "I haven't met him, but I know him by sight (= I recognize him, but do not know him)."informal She hated/loathed the sight of (= hated) her former husband.informal They used to be very good friends, but now they can't bear/stand the sight of (= hate) each other. The question seemed easy at first sight (= when they first saw it), but when the students tried to answer it, they discovered how difficult it was.the sights B1 places of interest, especially to visitors: We spent a fortnight in Rome looking at all the sights.sight unseen without seeing something first: I never buy anything sight unseen.
More examples

sight noun (MUCH)

a sight informal a lot; much: Food is a (darn/damn) sight more expensive than it used to be. He's a sight better than he was yesterday.

sight noun (GUN PART)

[C usually plural] a part of a gun or other device through which you look to help you aim at something: Make sure you line up the sights before you fire the gun.

sightverb [T]

uk   us   /saɪt/
to suddenly see something or someone: After days at sea, the sailors finally sighted land.
(Definition of sight from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of sight?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “sight” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
stretch the truth

to say something that is not completely honest in order to make someone or something seem better than it really is

Word of the Day

July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
by Liz Walter,
July 01, 2015
With America’s Independence Day on the 4th and France’s Bastille Day on the 14th, July certainly has a revolutionary theme, so this blog looks at words and phrases we use to talk about the dramatic and nation-changing events that these days celebrate. In particular, it focuses on one of the most important

Read More 

generation pause noun
generation pause noun
July 06, 2015
informal young adults who are not able to do things previously typical for their age group such as buy a home or start a family because of lack of money Meanwhile, a new study released last week revealed a quarter of Brits believe they’ll never own a property, leading them to be

Read More