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English definition of “silver”

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silver

noun [C or U] uk   /ˈsɪl.vər/ us    /-vɚ/
A2 ( symbol Ag) a chemical element that is a valuable shiny white metal , used for making cutlery (= knives, spoons, etc.), jewellery, coins, and decorative objects: We gave them a dish made of solid silver as a wedding present. Cleaning the silver (= silver objects) is a dirty job. Shall we use the silver (= knives, spoons, plates, etc. made of silver) for dinner tonight? I need some silver (= coins made of silver or a metal of similar appearance) for the ticket machine in the car park. ( also silver medal [C]) a small disc of silver, or a metal that looks like silver, that is given to the person who comes second in a competition, especially in a sport: Britain won (a) silver/a silver medal in the javelin.
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silver

adjective uk   /ˈsɪl.vər/ us    /-vɚ/
A2 made of silver, or of the colour of silver: a silver ring My grandmother has silver hair.
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silver

verb [T often passive] uk   /ˈsɪl.vər/ us    /-vɚ/
to cover something, especially a window, with a thin layer of silver-coloured material in order to make a mirror
Translations of “silver”
in Korean 은…
in Arabic فِضّة…
in French argent, argenterie…
in Turkish gümüş, gümüş eşyalar, gümüş madalya…
in Italian argento…
in Chinese (Traditional) 銀,銀子, 銀牌…
in Russian серебро, серебряные изделия, серебряная медаль…
in Polish srebro, srebra…
in Spanish plata…
in Portuguese prata…
in German das Silber…
in Catalan plata…
in Japanese 銀…
in Chinese (Simplified) 银,银子, 银牌…
(Definition of silver from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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