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English definition of “skip”

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skip

verb uk   /skɪp/ (-pp-) us  

skip verb (MOVE)

[I usually + adv/prep] to move lightly and quickly, making a small jump after each step: She watched her little granddaughter skip down the path. The lambs were skipping about in the field.

skip verb (JUMP)

[I] ( US jump rope, skip rope) to jump lightly over a rope that is held in both your hands, or by two other people, and turned repeatedly under your legs and over your head as exercise or a game: Sports players often train by skipping.

skip verb (LEAVE)

C1 [I or T] to leave one thing or place, especially quickly, in order to go to another: This part of the book isn't very interesting, so I'm going to skip (over) it. The teacher kept skipping from one subject to another so it was difficult to follow what he was saying. We're skipping over/across/off (= making a quick journey) to France for the day. The police think that the bank robbers must have skipped (= left) the country by now. She skipped off/out (= left quickly and/or secretly) without saying goodbye.

skip verb (AVOID)

B2 [T] informal to not do or not have something that you usually do or that you should do; to avoid: I'm trying to lose weight, so I'm skipping (= not eating) lunch today.

skip verb (throw)

[T] US ( UK skim) to throw a flat stone horizontally over water so that it touches and rises off the surface several times: We watched a child skipping stones across the lake.
Phrasal verbs

skip

noun [C] uk   /skɪp/ us  

skip noun [C] (CONTAINER)

UK ( US trademark Dumpster) a large metal container into which people put unwanted objects or building or garden waste, and which is brought to and taken away from a place by a special truck when people ask for it

skip noun [C] (MOVE)

a small, light, dancing or jumping step: She gave a little skip of joy.
(Definition of skip from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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