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English definition of “slow”

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slow

adjective uk   /sləʊ/ us    /sloʊ/

slow adjective (NOT FAST)

A1 moving, happening, or doing something without much speed: a slow runner/driver/reader She's a very slow eater. We're making slow but steady progress with the decorating. The government was very slow to react to the problem. Business is always slow during those months because everyone's on holiday.
Opposite
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slow adjective (NOT EXCITING)

B2 used to describe a film, book, play, etc. that does not have much excitement and action: His films are so slow they send me to sleep.

slow adjective (NOT CLEVER)

A person might be described as slow if they are not very clever and do not understand or notice things quickly: I feel so slow when I'm with Andrew - he's so much brighter than me. I was a bit slow off the mark/on the uptake there - I didn't follow his reasoning at all.
See also

slow adjective (TIME)

If a clock or watch is slow, it shows a time that is earlier than the real time: That clock is ten minutes slow.

slow

verb [I or T] uk   /sləʊ/ us    /sloʊ/
C2 to reduce speed or activity, or to make something do this: Business development has slowed in response to the recession. Traffic slows to a crawl (= goes so slowly it almost stops) during rush hour. The pilot was asked to slow his approach to the runway.
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slow

adverb uk   /sləʊ/ us    /sloʊ/
at a slow speed: I can't walk any slower. slow-moving traffic a slow-burning candle mainly US He drives too slow!
(Definition of slow from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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