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English definition of “special”

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special

adjective uk   /ˈspeʃ.əl/ us  

special adjective (NOT USUAL)

A2 not ordinary or usual: The car has a number of special safety features. Is there anything special that you'd like to do today? Passengers should tell the airline in advance if they have any special dietary needs. I don't expect special treatment - I just want to be treated fairly. Full details of the election results will be published in a special edition of tomorrow's newspaper. I have a suit for special occasions. There's a special offer on peaches ( UK also peaches are on special offer) (= they are being sold at a reduced price) this week.A2 especially great or important, or having a quality that most similar things or people do not have: Could I ask you a special favour? I'm cooking something special for her birthday.
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special adjective (PARTICULAR)

B1 [before noun] having a particular purpose: Firefighters use special breathing equipment in smoky buildings. Some of the children have special educational needs. You need special tyres on your car for snow. She works as a special adviser to the president.
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special

noun [C] uk   /ˈspeʃ.əl/ us  
a television programme that is made for a particular reason or occasion and is not part of a series: a three-hour election night special a dish that is available in a restaurant on a particular day that is not usually available: Today's specials are written on the board. mainly US a product that is being sold at a reduced price for a short period: Today's specials include T-shirts for only $2.99.
(Definition of special from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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