spite definition, meaning - what is spite in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “spite”

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spite

noun uk   us   /spaɪt/

spite noun (DESPITE)

in spite of sth
More examples
B1 (used before one fact that makes another fact surprising) despite: In spite of his injury, Ricardo will play in Saturday's match.
in spite of yourself used when you do something that you do not intend to do and are trying not to do: She started to laugh, in spite of herself .

spite noun (HURT)

C2 [U] a feeling of anger towards another person that makes someone want to annoy, upset, or hurt them, especially in a small way: He's the sort of man who would let down the tyres on your car just out of/from spite.
spiteful
adjective uk   us   /-fəl/ disapproving
spitefully
adverb uk   us   /-fəl.i/ disapproving
spitefulness
noun [U] uk   us   /-fəl.nəs/ disapproving

spite

verb [T] uk   us   /spaɪt/
to intentionally annoy, upset, or hurt someone: I almost think he died without making a will just to spite his family.
Translations of “spite”
in Arabic ضَغينة, حِقْد…
in Korean 악의, 앙심…
in Malaysian rasa busuk hati…
in French rancune…
in Turkish kin, garaz, nispet…
in Italian dispetto, spregio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 不管…
in Russian злоба…
in Polish złośliwość, złość…
in Vietnamese mối hận thù, sự giận…
in Spanish rencor…
in Portuguese ódio, rancor, malvadez…
in Thai เจตนาร้าย…
in German die Boshaftigkeit…
in Catalan despit, rancúnia…
in Japanese 恨み, 遺恨(いこん)…
in Indonesian itikad buruk…
in Chinese (Simplified) 不管…
(Definition of spite from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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