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English definition of “stick”

stick

noun uk   /stɪk/ us  

stick noun (THIN PIECE)

B1 [C] a thin piece of wood or other material: The old man was carrying a load of sticks. Police said that the child had been beaten with a stick. Find some dry sticks and we'll make a campfire. A lollipop is a sweet on a stick. B1 [C] mainly UK a long, thin wooden pole that especially old or injured people use to help them walk: a walking stick At 84 he's still quite active, although he walks with the aid of a stick. B1 [C] a long, thin piece of wood used in playing various sports: a hockey/lacrosse/polo stick [C] a long, thin piece of something: carrot/bread sticks a stick of celery/rhubarb/chewing gum/chalk/dynamite [C] informal a piece of furniture: When they got married, they didn't have a stick of furniture. take a stick to sb/sth to hit someone or something with a long, thin piece of wood: He said that when he was a boy, his father used to take a stick to him to punish him.

stick noun (CRITICISM)

[U] UK informal severe criticism: I really got/took stick from my boss about being late for work again. We gave him some stick for wearing that silly hat.

stick noun (COUNTRYSIDE)

the sticks [plural] informal disapproving an area in the countryside that is far from a town or city: I'm fed up with living in the sticks. They live out in the sticks somewhere.

stick

verb uk   /stɪk/ (stuck, stuck) us  

stick verb (FIX)

B1 [I or T] to cause something to become fixed, for example with glue or another similar substance: I tried to stick the pieces together with some glue/tape. He stuck up a notice on the board with pins. This glue won't stick. My car's stuck in the mud. Stir the sauce so that it doesn't stick to the pan. My book got wet and all the pages have stuck together. [I] If a name sticks, it continues to be used: Although her name is Clare, her little sister called her Lali, and somehow the name stuck.

stick verb (PUT)

informal to put something somewhere, especially in a not very careful way: "Where shall I put these books?" "Oh, just stick them on the table for now." She stuck her fingers in her ears so that she couldn't hear the noise. I'll pay for lunch - I can stick it on my expenses. [T usually + adv/prep] offensive If you tell someone to stick something or where they can stick something, it means that you do not want to keep that thing: "I've had enough of working here," she said, "You can stick your job!"

stick verb (PUSH INTO)

B2 [I or T, usually + adv/prep] to push a pointed object into or through something, or (of a pointed object) to be pushed into or through something and stay there: She stuck the needle into my arm. We decided where to go for our holiday by closing our eyes and sticking a pin in the map. A thorn stuck in her finger. The metal springs were sticking through the mattress.

stick verb (NOT CONTINUE)

[I] In some card games, if you stick, you say that you do not want to be given any more cards.

stick verb (ACCEPT)

[T] UK informal to bear or accept something or someone unpleasant: I don't think I can stick this job a day longer. [+ -ing verb] I don't know how you can stick living in this place.
(Definition of stick from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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