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English definition of “still”

still

adverb uk   /stɪl/ us  

still adverb (CONTINUING)

A2 continuing to happen or continuing to be done: I'm still hungry. I still haven't finished my essay. There is still no news about the hostages. Do you still work for the government? Hope is fading that the missing child is still alive. There's still time for us to get to the cinema before the film starts.

still adverb (DESPITE)

B1 despite that: You may not approve of what he did, but he's still your brother. I know you don't like her, but you still don't have to be so rude to her. Even though she hasn't really got the time, she still offered to help.

still adverb (GREATER DEGREE)

B2 to an even greater degree or in an even greater amount: The number of people killed in the explosion is likely to rise still higher. The company is hoping to extend its market still further. Still more snow fell overnight. I'll meet you at the theatre. No, better still, let's meet in a pub and have a drink first. I'm worried that his car has broken down, or worse still, that he's had an accident. Why do you have to tell me still (= even) more lies?

still

still

verb [T] uk   /stɪl/ us  
to make something stop moving or become more calm: He tried to still the swaying of the hammock.literary She cuddled her baby to still its cries.

still

noun uk   /stɪl/ us  

still noun (NOT MOVING)

[C] specialized theatre & film a photograph of a piece of action in a film [U] literary a time when it is quiet and calm: In the still of the night, nothing moved.

still noun (EQUIPMENT)

[C] a piece of equipment used for making alcohol
(Definition of still from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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