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English definition of “straight”

straight

adjective, adverb uk   /streɪt/ us  

straight adjective, adverb (NOT CURVING)

A2 continuing in one direction without bending or curving: a straight line She's got straight blonde hair. Skirts this summer are long and straight. Can't you see it? - it's straight ahead (of you)! The dog seemed to be coming straight at/for me. Go straight along this road and turn left at the traffic lights.

straight adjective, adverb (HONEST)

B2 honest: Just be straight with her and tell her how you feel.informal Tell me straight, would you rather we didn't go tonight? straight out If you tell someone something straight out, you say it directly and honestly, without trying to make what you are saying more pleasant: I told her straight out that I didn't love her any more.

straight

adverb uk   /streɪt/ us  

straight adverb (IMMEDIATELY)

B1 immediately: I got home and went straight to bed. Shall we go straight to the party or stop off at a pub first? Time is short so I'll get straight to the point (= explain the matter immediately).
See also
straight away/off B1 mainly UK immediately: I knew straight away what you were thinking. We don't need to go straight off - we can stay for a little while.

straight adverb (CLEAR)

C1 clearly: You know you've had too much to drink when you can't see straight. I'm so tired I can't think straight any more.

straight

adjective uk   /streɪt/ us  

straight adjective (CLEAR)

C1 [before noun] clear or not complicated: It's a straight choice - either you leave him or you stay. Let's get this straight - you're travelling to Frankfurt on Monday and Brussels on Tuesday, is that correct?

straight adjective (LEVEL)

B2 level and not sloping to either side: This picture's not straight. The shelf isn't straight - it sags in the middle.

straight adjective (TIDY)

[after verb] mainly UK tidy, or arranged in order: It only took an hour to get the flat straight after the party. Do you have a mirror? - I'll just put my hair straight.

straight adjective (PLAIN)

plain and basic, or without anything added: No tonic for me, please, I like my vodka straight. Straight pasta is very bland - you need some kind of sauce to make it interesting.

straight adjective (FOLLOWING EACH OTHER)

[before noun] following one after another without an interruption: They're the only team to have won ten straight games this season.

straight adjective (TRADITIONAL)

informal traditional or serious: disapproving He was a nice enough bloke, but he was so straight - I always felt I had to be on my best behaviour with him. There's a lot of straight theatre at the festival as well as the newer, more experimental stuff.

straight adjective (SEXUAL PREFERENCE)

informal not gay

straight adjective (NO DRUGS)

informal not using illegal drugs or alcohol: He's been straight for five months.

straight adjective (NOT OWING MONEY)

[after verb] informal neither owing nor owed any money: You bought the tickets, so if I pay for the taxi, we'll be straight.

straight

noun [C] uk   /streɪt/ us  

straight noun [C] (SPORTS TRACK)

(US usually straightaway) the straight part of a racetrack (= the track on which competitors race): And the runners are just coming up to the finishing straight.

straight noun [C] (SEXUAL PREFERENCE)

informal a person who is not gay
(Definition of straight from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of straight?
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