strength Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "strength" - English Dictionary

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strengthnoun

uk   us   /streŋθ/

strength noun (POWER)

B2 [U] the ability to do things that need a lot of physical or mental effort: She had the strength and stamina to take the lead and win the gold medal. Admitting you've made a mistake is a sign of strength, not weakness. He showed great strength of character when he refused to accept the bribes. We shall struggle on, drawing our strength from the courage of others. Much of the country's military strength lies in its missile force.C2 [C usually singular] the degree to which something is strong or powerful: Opinion polls put the combined strength of the two parties at 15 percent nationwide. You can gauge (= measure) the strength of a democracy by the way it treats its minorities.
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strength noun (GOOD FEATURE)

C1 [C] a good characteristic: She's well aware of her strengths and weaknesses as an artist. His greatest strengths are his determination and resilience.

strength noun (NUMBER)

[U] the number of people in a group: What's the current strength of the Cambridgeshire police force?in strength in large numbers: Demonstrators arrived in strength to protest against the closure of the factory.below strength UK If a group is below strength, it consists of fewer people or members than usual: The office will be below strength in August when a lot of people will be away.at full strength with the complete number of people who are usually in a group: Staff cuts have meant that we haven't been working at full strength for a year.
(Definition of strength from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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