subject definition, meaning - what is subject in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “subject”

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subject

noun [C] uk   us   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/

subject noun [C] (AREA OF DISCUSSION)

B1 the thing that is being discussed, considered, or studied: Our subject for discussion is homelessness. She has made a series of documentaries on the subject of family relationships. The guest lecturer took as her subject (= decided to speak about) "punishment and imprisonment in modern society". The number of planes flying over the town has been the subject of (= has caused) concern since last summer.
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subject noun [C] (AREA OF STUDY)

A1 an area of knowledge that is studied in school, college, or university: My favourite subjects at school were history and geography.mainly UK Her subject (= special area of study) is low-temperature physics.change the subject B2 to start talking about a different subject: I'd tried to explain the situation, but he just changed the subject.

subject noun [C] (STORY/PAINTING)

C2 a person, thing, or situation that is written about in a book, article, etc. or shown in a picture, etc.: The mill by the bridge was the subject of an unfinished painting by J. M. W. Turner.

subject noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

B1 specialized language the person or thing that performs the action of a verb, or is joined to a description by a verb: "Bob" is the subject of the sentence "Bob threw the ball."
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subject noun [C] (PERSON)

a person who lives in or who has the right to live in a particular country, especially a country with a king or queen: He is a British subject.
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Grammar

subject

verb [T] uk   us   /səbˈdʒekt/
to defeat people or a country and then control them against their wishes and limit their freedom: The invaders quickly subjected the local tribes.
Phrasal verbs

subject

adjective uk   us   /ˈsʌb.dʒekt/

subject adjective (HAVING)

be subject to sth C1 to have or experience a particular thing, especially something unpleasant: Cars are subject to a high domestic tax. In recent years, she has been subject to attacks of depression.

subject adjective (DEPEND)

subject to sth C2 only able to happen if something else happens: We plan to go on Wednesday, subject to your approval. Moving all the books should not take long, subject to there being (= if there are) enough helpers.

subject adjective (GOVERN)

[before noun] under the political control of another country or state: subject peoples/states
(Definition of subject from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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