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English definition of “substitute”

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substitute

verb uk   /ˈsʌb.stɪ.tjuːt/ us    /-tuːt/
B2 [T] to use something or someone instead of another thing or person: You can substitute oil for butter in this recipe. Dayton was substituted for Williams in the second half of the match.substitute for sth to perform the same job as another thing or to take its place: Gas-fired power stations will substitute for less efficient coal-fired equipment.
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substitute

noun [C] uk   /ˈsʌb.stɪ.tjuːt/ us    /-tuːt/
B2 a thing or person that is used instead of another thing or person: Tofu can be used as a meat substitute in vegetarian recipes. Vitamins should not be used as a substitute for a healthy diet. ( informal sub) in sports, a player who is used for part of a game instead of another player: Johnson came on as a substitute towards the end of the match. The manager brought on ( US also sent in) another substitute in the final minutes of the game.there is no substitute for sth nothing is as good as the stated thing: You can work from plans of a garden, but there's no substitute for visiting the site yourself. US ( informal sub) a substitute teacher
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Translations of “substitute”
in Korean 대체품, 대리인…
in Arabic بَديل…
in French substituer…
in Turkish vekil, yedek…
in Italian sostituto, -a, surrogato…
in Chinese (Traditional) 用…代替,代之以…
in Russian заместитель, замена…
in Polish zastęp-ca/czyni, zamiennik…
in Spanish sustituir…
in Portuguese substituto…
in German ersetzen…
in Catalan substitut, -a…
in Japanese 代わりの人(物), 代理人, 代用品…
in Chinese (Simplified) 用…代替,代之以…
(Definition of substitute from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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