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English definition of “suck”

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suck

verb uk   /sʌk/ us  

suck verb (PULL IN)

C2 [I or T] to pull in liquid or air through your mouth without using your teeth, or to move the tongue and muscles of the mouth around something inside your mouth, often in order to dissolve it: She was sitting on the grass sucking lemonade through a straw. I sucked my thumb until I was seven. I tried sucking (on) a mint to stop myself coughing. They used to give you sweets to suck on in planes to stop your ears from going pop. [T + adv/prep] Something that sucks a liquid or an object in a particular direction pulls it with great force: The waves came crashing over my head and I could feel myself being sucked under by the currents. figurative Continued rapid growth in consumer spending will suck in (= encourage) more imports.
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suck verb (BE BAD)

[I] slang If someone or something sucks, that person or thing is bad or unpleasant: Man, this job sucks! While my brother was sick, I had to do all of his chores and it sucked.

suck

noun [C usually singular] uk   /sʌk/ us  
the action of sucking something: Can I have a suck of your lollipop, please?
Translations of “suck”
in Korean 빨다…
in Arabic يَرْشُف, يَمُصّ…
in French téter, boire, sucer…
in Turkish emmek…
in Italian succhiare, ciucciare…
in Chinese (Traditional) 吸入, 吸, 吮吸…
in Russian сосать…
in Polish ssać…
in Spanish mamar, chupar, sorber…
in Portuguese sugar, chupar…
in German saugen, lutschen, einsaugen…
in Catalan xuclar…
in Japanese ~をしゃぶる, なめる, 吸う…
in Chinese (Simplified) 吸入, 吸, 吮吸…
(Definition of suck from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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