suppose Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "suppose" - English Dictionary

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supposeverb

uk   /səˈpəʊz/  us   /-ˈpoʊz/

suppose verb (THINK LIKELY)

A2 [T] to think that something is likely to be true: [+ (that)] I couldn't get any reply when I called Dan, so I suppose (that) he's gone out. He found it a lot more difficult to get a job than he supposed it would be. [+ (that)] Do you suppose (that) Gillian will marry him? It is widely supposed (that) the minister will be forced to resign. [+ to infinitive] We all supposed him to be German, but in fact he was Swiss. Her new book is supposed to be (= generally people think it is) very good. [+ (that)] used in making polite requests: I don't suppose (that) you could/I suppose you couldn't lend me £5 till tomorrow, could you? [+ (that)] used to show that you think something is so, although you wish that it were not: I suppose (that) all the tickets will be sold by now. [+ (that)] used when you are annoyed: I suppose (that) you're going to be late again. I suppose (that) you think that's funny. Well, I certainly don't.B1 used to show unwillingness to agree: "Can I go out tonight?" "Oh, I suppose so." [+ (that)] I don't agree with it, but I suppose (that) it's for the best.
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suppose verb (NEED)

[T] formal to expect and need: Investment of this kind supposes (= would not be possible without) an increase in the company's profits this year.
See also

supposeconjunction

uk   /səˈpəʊz/  us   /-ˈpoʊz/ (also supposing)
(Definition of suppose from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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