surprise Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "surprise" - English Dictionary

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surprisenoun

uk   /səˈpraɪz/  us   /sɚ-/

surprise noun (EVENT)

A2 [C] an unexpected event: Don't tell Anne we've arranged a party for her - I want it to be a surprise. It was a wonderful/nasty surprise to get home and find the letter. Last night's heavy snow came as a complete surprise. You're always full of surprises (= doing unexpected things). I wish you wouldn't keep springing surprises on me (= telling me unexpected things or causing unexpected things to happen). They mounted a surprise attack at dawn. My uncle paid us a surprise visit yesterday.
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surprise noun (FEELING)

B2 [U] the feeling caused by something unexpected happening: He looked at her in/with surprise. To my great surprise, they agreed to all our demands.

surpriseverb [T]

uk   /səˈpraɪz/  us   /sɚ-/
B1 to make someone feel surprise: The news surprised everyone. [+ that] It doesn't surprise me that their parents don't want them to get married. [+ to infinitive] It will not surprise anyone to learn that the offer has been rejected. [+ question word] Janet was surprised how quickly the time passed. to find, catch, or attack someone when they are not expecting it: The robbers had just opened the safe when they were surprised by the police. [+ -ing verb] His mother surprised him helping himself to her gin.
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(Definition of surprise from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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