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English definition of “suspicion”

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suspicion

noun uk   /səˈspɪʃ.ən/ us  

suspicion noun (FEELING)

B2 [C] a belief or idea that something may be true: [+ that] I have a suspicion that he only asked me out because my brother persuaded him to. She had a nagging/sneaking suspicion that she might have sent the letter to the wrong address.
More examples
  • I've got a sneaking suspicion that we're going the wrong way.
  • We always had the suspicion that their marriage was not happy.
  • I had a suspicion that he was up to something.
  • They had been fooling me all along, and I had no suspicion.
  • I had no suspicion that the firm might close.

suspicion noun (BELIEF IN SOMEONE'S GUILT)

C1 [C or U] a feeling or belief that someone has committed a crime or done something wrong: "I'm arresting you on suspicion of illegally possessing drugs," said the police officer. mainly UK She is under suspicion of murder. In this particular case, they are above/beyond suspicion (= cannot be thought to be guilty). His strange behaviour aroused/raised his neighbours' suspicions.
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suspicion noun (DOUBT)

[C or U] doubt or lack of trust: Since they discovered the truth about his background, his colleagues have regarded him with suspicion. They feel that she harbours (= has) suspicions of their politics.

suspicion noun (SMALL AMOUNT)

[S] a small amount: He gave just a suspicion of a smile. I have a suspicion of doubt about whether I should accept his invitation or not.
(Definition of suspicion from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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