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English definition of “switch”

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switch

noun uk   /swɪtʃ/ us  

switch noun (DEVICE)

B1 [C] a small device, usually pushed up or down with your finger, that controls and turns on or off an electric current: a light switch Can you flip the switch?switches [plural] US ( mainly UK points) a place on a railway track where the rails (= metal bars on which the trains travel) can be moved to allow a train to change from one track to another: The train rattled as it went over the switches.
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switch noun (CHANGE)

[C] a sudden or complete change, especially of one person or thing for another

switch

verb [T, I usually + adv/prep] uk   /swɪtʃ/ us  

switch verb [T, I usually + adv/prep] (DEVICE)

B1 to use a switch to change a device from one state or type of operation to another: switch the TV off/on
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switch verb [T, I usually + adv/prep] (CHANGE)

B2 to change suddenly or completely, especially from one thing to another, or to exchange by replacing one person or thing with another: She started studying English at college, but switched to Business Studies in her second year. In 1971, Britain switched over (= changed completely) to a decimal currency. After the bank robbery, the gang switched cars (= left one car and got into another).
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(Definition of switch from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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