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English definition of “system”

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system

noun uk   /ˈsɪs.təm/ us  

system noun (SET)

B1 [C] a set of connected things or devices that operate together: a central heating systemB1 [C] a set of computer equipment and programs used together for a particular purpose: The system keeps crashing and no one is able to figure out why.C2 [C] a set of organs or structures in the body that have a particular purpose: the immune system the nervous system [C] the way that the body works, especially the way that it digests food and passes out waste products: A run in the morning is good for the system - it wakes the body up and gets everything going.
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system noun (METHOD)

B2 [C] a way of doing things: We'll have to work out a proper filing system. Under our education system, you're supposed to be able to choose the type of schooling that your child receives. The legal system operates very differently in the US and Britain.B2 [C] a particular method of counting, measuring, or weighing things: the metric system of measuring and weighing [U] approving the intentional and organized use of a system: There doesn't seem to be any system to the books on these shelves - they're certainly not in alphabetical order.the system disapproving unfair laws and rules that prevent people from being able to improve their situation: He has his own ways of beating the system, making sure that he has good relationships with influential people.
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(Definition of system from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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