tight Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "tight" - English Dictionary

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tightadjective, adverb

uk   us   /taɪt/
B2 (held or kept together) firmly or closely: I can't untie the knot - it's too tight. This lid is on very tight. The people stood talking in tight groups. Hold on tight when we go round this corner. Check that windows and doors are shut tight (= completely closed) before you leave. The plastic cover was stretched tight (= stretched as much as it could be) across the tank.
More examples

tightadjective

uk   us   /taɪt/

tight adjective (UNCOMFORTABLE)

B1 Clothes or shoes that are tight fit the body too closely and are uncomfortable: That jacket's too tight - you want a bigger size. If you have a tight feeling in your chest you have an uncomfortable feeling of pressure, caused by illness, fear, etc.

tight adjective (LIMITING)

B2 Controls or rules that are tight are ones that severely limit what can happen: tight security

tight adjective (NOT MUCH)

B2 If time or money is tight, there is only just enough of it: I'm sorry I can't stop, time's really tight. They're raising three kids on one small salary so money is very tight.

tight adjective (NOT GENEROUS)

informal disapproving →  tight-fisted

tight adjective (DRUNK)

old-fashioned informal having drunk too much alcohol: Jim, you're tight!
Synonym

tight adjective (RELATIONSHIP)

informal If you are tight with someone, you know that person very well and like them a lot: We're tight - we've been best friends since we were at school.
tightness
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈtaɪt.nəs/
(Definition of tight from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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