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English definition of “title”

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title

noun uk   /ˈtaɪ.tl̩/ us    /-t̬l̩/

title noun (NAME)

B1 [C] the name of a film, book, painting, piece of music, etc.: The title of Evelyn Waugh's first novel was "Decline and Fall". And this next record is the title track on the album ".The Red Shoes". (= the piece of music and the record are both called "The Red Shoes"). titles [plural] ( also credits) the information given at the end or beginning of a film or television programme, stating the names of the people who acted in it or were involved in its production [C] specialized publishing a book: Last year we published over a hundred new titles.
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title noun (PERSON)

[C] a word that is used before someone's name, stating their social rank, qualifications, position in an organization, sex, etc.: What's her title - is she Professor or just Doctor? He will retain the honorary title of non-executive chairman. What's your job title now - are you managing director?
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title noun (SPORTS PRIZE)

C2 [C] the position you get by beating all other competitors in a sports competition: Hendry won the world snooker title after a tense 35-frame final.

title noun (LEGAL RIGHT)

[U] the legal right to own a piece of land or a building: If you wish to sell the property, you will first have to prove your title to it.

title

verb [T] uk   /ˈtaɪ.tl̩/ us    /-t̬l̩/
to give a title to a book, movie, play, song, or work of art: He titled his autobiography "Beneath the Underdog".
(Definition of title from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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