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English definition of “token”

token

noun [C] uk   /ˈtəʊ.kən/ us    /ˈtoʊ-/

token noun [C] (SYMBOL)

C1 something that you do, or a thing that you give someone, that expresses your feelings or intentions, although it might have little practical effect: As a token of our gratitude for all that you have done, we would like you to accept this small gift. It doesn't have to be a big present - it's just a token.

token noun [C] (PAPER WORTH MONEY)

UK (US gift certificate) a piece of paper with a particular amount of money printed on it that can be exchanged in a shop for goods of that value: a £20 book/gift/record token

token noun [C] (DISC)

C1 a round metal or plastic disc that is used instead of money in some machines

token

adjective [before noun] uk   /ˈtəʊ.kən/ us    /ˈtoʊ-/
used to describe actions that are done to show that you are doing something, even if the results are limited in their effect: The troops in front of us either surrendered or offered only token (= not much) resistance. They were the only country to argue for even token recognition of the Baltic states' independence. disapproving describes something that is done to prevent other people complaining, although it is not sincerely meant and has no real effect: The truth is that they appoint no more than a token number of women to managerial jobs.
(Definition of token from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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