tolerance definition, meaning - what is tolerance in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “tolerance”

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tolerance

noun uk   /ˈtɒl.ər.əns/  us   /ˈtɑː.lɚ-/

tolerance noun (ACCEPTANCE)

C2 [U] (formal toleration ) willingness to accept behaviour and beliefs that are different from your own, although you might not agree with or approve of them: This period in history is not noted for its religious tolerance. Some members of the party would like to see it develop a greater tolerance of/towards contrary points of view.
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tolerance noun (ABILITY TO DEAL WITH)

[U] the ability to deal with something unpleasant or annoying, or to continue existing despite bad or difficult conditions: My tolerance of heat is considerably greater after having lived in the Far East for a couple of years. [U] specialized biology an animal's or plant's ability not to be harmed by a drug or poison over a long period of time: a greater tolerance of/to the drug

tolerance noun (VARIATION)

[C or U] specialized engineering, mathematics the amount by which a measurement or calculation might change and still be acceptable: parts that are made to tolerances of a thousandth of an inch
Translations of “tolerance”
in Korean 아량, 관용, 참을성…
in Arabic تَسامُح…
in Portuguese tolerância…
in Catalan tolerància…
in Japanese 寛容, 容認…
in Italian tolleranza…
in Chinese (Traditional) 接受, 寬容, 忍受…
in Russian терпимость…
in Turkish hoşgörü, tolerans…
in Chinese (Simplified) 接受, 宽容, 忍受…
in Polish tolerancja…
(Definition of tolerance from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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