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English definition of “total”

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total

noun [C] uk   /ˈtəʊ.təl/ us    /ˈtoʊ.t̬əl/
B1 the amount you get when several smaller amounts are added together: At that time of day, cars with only one occupant accounted for almost 80 percent of the total. A total of 21 horses were entered for the race. We made £700 in total, over three days of trading.
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total

adjective uk   /ˈtəʊ.təl/ us    /ˈtoʊ.t̬əl/

total adjective (AMOUNT)

B1 [before noun] including everything: the total cost Total losses were $800.
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total adjective (VERY GREAT)

B2 very great or of the largest degree possible: total secrecy a total disregard for their feelings total silence The organization of the event was a total shambles (= very bad). The collapse, when it came, was total.
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total

verb [L only + noun, T] uk   /ˈtəʊ.təl/ us    /ˈtoʊ.t̬əl/ (-ll- or US usually -l-)
C1 to have as a complete amount, or to calculate this: This is the eighth volume in the series, which totals 21 volumes in all. We totalled (up) the money we had each earned, and then shared it equally among the three of us.
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Translations of “total”
in Korean 총, 전체의…
in Arabic إجْمالي, كامِل, كُلّي…
in French total, complet…
in Turkish toplam, tam, tamam…
in Italian totale…
in Chinese (Traditional) 總額, 總數…
in Russian суммарный, абсолютный, полный…
in Polish całkowity, zupełny…
in Spanish total…
in Portuguese total…
in German Gesamt-…, völlig…
in Catalan total, global, absolut…
in Japanese 全部の, 合計の, まったくの…
in Chinese (Simplified) 总额, 总数…
(Definition of total from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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