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English definition of “trick”

trick

noun [C] uk   /trɪk/ us  

trick noun [C] (ACT OF DECEIVING)

B1 an action that is intended to deceive, either as a way of cheating someone, or as a joke or form of entertainment: She played a really nasty trick on me - she put syrup in my shampoo bottle! My niece was showing me all the tricks that she's learned to do with her new magic set. It's a bit of trick photography - she's meant to look like she's walking on water. be a trick of the light to be an effect caused by light, making something appear different: For a moment I thought you had a patch of grey hairs, but it's just a trick of the light.

trick noun [C] (METHOD)

B2 an effective or quick way of doing something: What's the trick of getting this chair to fold up? On page 21, some tricks to speed up your beauty routine.

trick

verb [T] uk   /trɪk/ us  
B2 to deceive someone, often as a part of a plan: Dean tricked the old lady into giving him eight hundred pounds.

trick

adjective [before noun] uk   /trɪk/ us  

trick adjective [before noun] (DECEIVING)

used to deceive someone, either as a joke or form of entertainment or so that they makes a mistake: a trick question

trick adjective [before noun] (WEAK)

US describes a part of the body, especially a joint (= place where two bones are connected), that sometimes feels weak suddenly and unexpectedly: I've got a trick ankle that gives me problems if I do much running.
(Definition of trick from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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