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English definition of “trot”

trot

verb uk   /trɒt/ us    /trɑːt/ (-tt-)

trot verb (RUN)

[I usually + adv/prep] If a horse or similar animal with four legs trots, it runs at its slowest speed, using short steps in which a front leg and the back leg on the opposite side move together: We were trotting along the lane when a car suddenly appeared from nowhere and almost made me fall off my pony. The dog trotted down the path to greet me.

trot verb (HURRY)

[I usually + adv/prep] informal When people trot somewhere, they go there in a quick or busy way: She left her purse on the counter, so I had to trot down the street after her. "I'm in a bit of a rush - I'll call you!" said James, and off he trotted. Although she retired from politics five years ago, she still trots around the globe, giving speeches and meeting world leaders.
See also
[I + adv/prep] to speak or do something too quickly: She was rather nervous and trotted through her speech a bit too quickly.

trot

noun uk   /trɒt/ us    /trɑːt/

trot noun (RUN)

[S] the speed or movement of a horse or similar animal when it trots: He climbed onto his horse and set off at a relaxed trot down the lane. [S] a slow run by a human: The team warmed up for the match with a trot around the pitch.

trot noun (ILLNESS)

the trots [plural] informal diarrhoea (= a condition in which the contents of the bowels are emptied too often): to get/have the trots That prawn curry gave me the trots.
(Definition of trot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of trot?
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