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English definition of “upset”

upset

verb [T] uk   /ʌpˈset/ (present participle upsetting, past tense and past participle upset) us  

upset verb [T] (WORRY)

B2 to make someone worried, unhappy, or angry: It still upsets him when he thinks about the accident. Don't upset yourself by thinking about what might have been.

upset verb [T] (CHANGE)

to change the usual or expected state or order of something, especially in a way that stops it from happening or working: Any mechanical problems would upset our plans of driving across the desert.

upset verb [T] (KNOCK)

to push or knock something out of its usual position, usually by accident, especially causing it to fall: Our dog upset the picnic table, spilling food everywhere.

upset verb [T] (MAKE SICK)

to make someone feel slightly sick: He can't eat grapes - they upset him/his stomach.

upset

adjective uk   /ʌpˈset/ us  

upset adjective (WORRIED)

A2 [after verb] worried, unhappy, or angry: Don't get upset about the dress - there's only a little stain on it. [+ to infinitive] She was very upset to hear that the holiday had been cancelled. [+ that] He was very upset that you didn't reply to his letters.

upset adjective (ILL)

B2 informal If you have an upset stomach you feel slightly ill, especially because of something you have eaten or drunk: I've got an upset stomach/tummy - serves me right for eating so much.

upset

noun uk   /ˈʌp.set/ us  

upset noun (CHANGE)

[U] confusion and problems: How much upset will the new monitoring procedures cause? [C] an occasion when someone beats the team or player that was expected to win: It would be quite an upset if the favourite didn't win.

upset noun (ILLNESS)

[C] informal a slight illness of the stomach: Melanie's got a stomach/tummy upset so she won't be going to school today.
(Definition of upset from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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