Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “vote”

vote

verb [I or T] uk   /vəʊt/ us    /voʊt/
B1 to express your choice or opinion, especially by officially writing a mark on a paper or by raising your hand or speaking in a meeting: She was too young to vote in the national election. The committee voted on the proposal, and accepted it unanimously. Did you vote for or against the motion? Over 55 percent voted Liberal. [+ to infinitive] Staff voted to accept the offer of an eight percent pay rise. [+ (that)] I vote (that) we (= it is my opinion that we should) go to the cinema first and eat afterwards. [+ obj + noun ] The evening was voted a tremendous success (= this was most people's opinion). It was the younger members who voted Smith onto the committee. The Republican Party was voted into/out of office (= was chosen in an election to become/stop being the government).

vote

noun uk   /vəʊt/ us    /voʊt/
B1 [C] the act of showing your choice or opinion in an election or meeting by writing a cross on an official piece of paper or putting your hand up: The suggestion was approved, with 25 votes in favour, and seven against. She cast her vote (= voted) for the Communist Party. B2 [C usually singular] a way of making a decision by asking a group of people to vote: We called a meeting in order to take/hold a vote on the issue. the vote [S] the total number of votes given or received in an election: The party got/took 25 percent of the vote. They are trying to capture the working-class vote (= to persuade those people to vote for them). C1 the fact of being officially allowed to vote: In some countries women still don't have the vote. put sth to the/a vote to vote on something: The proposal was read out and then put to the vote.
(Definition of vote from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of vote?
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Refusing & rejecting, but you might be interested in these topics from the Expressing opposition & disapproval topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “vote” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

shadow

an area of darkness, caused by light being blocked by something

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More