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English definition of “warm”

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warm

adjective uk   /wɔːm/ us    /wɔːrm/

warm adjective (TEMPERATURE)

A1 having or producing a comfortably high temperature, although not hot: Are you warm enough or do you want the fire on? I've got my hands in my pockets to keep them warm.A2 Warm clothes and covers are made of a material that keeps you warm: I don't have a warm winter coat. Those gloves look nice and warm. A warm colour is one that is based on or contains a colour such as red, yellow, or orange that suggests warmth.the warm UK a warm place: It's cold standing out there - come into the warm.
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warm adjective (FRIENDLY)

B1 friendly and loving: They're a very warm family. He has a lovely warm smile. I'd like to give a warm welcome to our guests this evening.
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warm adjective (NEAR)

[after verb] informal (especially in children's games) near to guessing a correct answer or to discovering a hidden object: You're getting warmer!
warmly
adverb uk   /ˈwɔːm.li/ us    /ˈwɔːrm-/
B2 He shook my hand warmly. You're not dressed warmly enough - put a sweater on.
warmth
noun [U] uk   /wɔːmθ/ us    /wɔːrmθ/
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B2 I've put a T-shirt on under my sweater for extra warmth.

warm

verb [I or T] uk   /wɔːm/ us    /wɔːrm/
B2 to (cause to) become warm (= less cold): You're so cold - come and warm your hands by the fire. Your supper's just warming through in the oven. We can warm (up) the room quite quickly with this electric fire.
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(Definition of warm from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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