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English definition of “wedge”

wedge

noun uk   /wedʒ/ us  

wedge noun (SHAPE)

[C] a piece of metal, wood, rubber, etc. with a pointed edge at one end and a wide edge at the other, either pushed between two objects to keep them still or forced into something to break pieces off it: Push a wedge under the door to keep it open while we're carrying the boxes in. Pieces of stone can be split off by forcing wedges between the layers. [C] a piece of something, especially food, in the shape of a triangle: Auntie Ann put a huge wedge of fruit cake on my plate. a wedge of cheese

wedge noun (SHOES)

wedges [plural] women's shoes with a heel all the way under the shoe

wedge

verb [T] uk   /wedʒ/ us  
to make something stay in a particular position by using a wedge: [+ adj] Find something to wedge the window open/closed with. to put something into a very small or narrow space, so that it cannot move easily: Her shoe came off and got wedged between the bars. I was standing waiting for a bus, wedged between (= fixed between and unable to move away from) two old ladies and their bags of shopping.
(Definition of wedge from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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