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English definition of “week”

week

noun [C] uk   /wiːk/ us  
A1 a period of seven days, especially either from Monday to Sunday or from Sunday to Saturday: last/this/next week We go to the cinema about once a week. Will you be going to next week's class? It usually takes about four weeks to get the forms processed. Don't do anything strenuous for a week or two. It'll be weeks (= several weeks) before the flood damage is cleared up. A1 the five days from Monday to Friday, the usual working period for many people: We're usually too tired to do much socializing during the week. one week after the day mentioned: The first performance of the play is a week today/tomorrow. Our holiday starts a week on Saturday. She has to go back to see the doctor Friday week. one week before the day mentioned: The problems with the TV started a week last Monday. It was his birthday a week ago this Friday. the amount of hours spent working during a week or the number of days on which a person works: A lot of farm labourers work a six-day week. week by week each week during a period of time: We could see his health deteriorate week by week. week after week (also week in, week out) regularly or continuously for many weeks: I go to aerobics three times a week, week in, week out.
(Definition of week from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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