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English definition of “where”

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where

adverb, conjunction uk   /weər/ us    /wer/
A1 to, at, or in what place: Where does he live? "I put it on your desk." "Where? I can't see it?" Where are we going? Now where did I put my glasses? Where's the party being held? Could you tell me where Barker Drive is please? Where did you put my umbrella? I've left my keys somewhere and I don't know where. You've found my diary - where on Earth was it? I've been meaning to ask you where you get your hair cut. Bradford, where Bren comes from, has a lot of good curry restaurants. She lived in Rome for a couple of years, where she taught English. You see where Mira is standing? Well, he's behind her. I like to have him next to me where I can keep an eye on him. I read it somewhere - I don't know where (= in which book, newspaper, etc.).B2 used when referring to a particular stage in a process or activity: You reach a point in any project where you just want to get the thing finished. I've reached the stage where I just don't care any more. in what situation: You're not available on the 12th and Andrew can't make the 20th - so where does that leave us? Where do you see yourself five years from now?
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Translations of “where”
in Korean 어디에…
in Arabic أيْن…
in French oû…
in Turkish nerede…
in Italian dove…
in Chinese (Traditional) 去哪裡, 在哪裡, 處於某種階段…
in Russian где?…
in Polish gdzie…
in Spanish dónde…
in Portuguese onde, aonde…
in German wo(-hin, -her)…
in Catalan on…
in Japanese どこに(へ、を、で)…
in Chinese (Simplified) 去哪里, 在哪里, 处于某种阶段…
(Definition of where from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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