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English definition of “whole”

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whole

adjective uk   /həʊl/ us    /hoʊl/
A2 complete or not divided: I spent the whole day cleaning. There's still a whole month till my birthday. After my exercise class, my whole body ached. The whole town was destroyed by the earthquake. This whole thing (= situation) is ridiculous. Bill does nothing but moan the whole time (= all the time). You have to stand up in court and promise to tell "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth". Her dance compositions added a whole (= completely) new dimension to the contemporary dance repertoire. informal used to emphasize something: I've got a whole heap of work to do this afternoon. The new computers are a whole lot (= much) faster.
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whole

whole

noun [C usually singular] uk   /həʊl/ us    /hoʊl/
a complete thing: Two halves make a whole. You must consider each problem as an aspect of the whole.the whole of sth B1 all of something: I'll be on holiday the whole of next week. The whole of his finger was bruised. The whole of the village (= everyone in the village) had come out for the party.
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Translations of “whole”
in Korean 전체의…
in Arabic كامِل…
in French (tout) entier, (en) entier…
in Turkish tüm, bütün, tümü…
in Italian intero, tutto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 全部的, 整個的, 整體的…
in Russian целый, весь…
in Polish cały, w całości…
in Spanish entero, íntegro, todo…
in Portuguese todo, inteiro…
in German ganz…
in Catalan tot, sencer…
in Japanese 全体の, 全部の…
in Chinese (Simplified) 全部的, 整个的, 整体的…
(Definition of whole from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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