Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “whole”

See all translations

whole

adjective uk   /həʊl/ us    /hoʊl/
A2 complete or not divided: I spent the whole day cleaning. There's still a whole month till my birthday. After my exercise class, my whole body ached. The whole town was destroyed by the earthquake. This whole thing (= situation) is ridiculous. Bill does nothing but moan the whole time (= all the time). You have to stand up in court and promise to tell "the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth". Her dance compositions added a whole (= completely) new dimension to the contemporary dance repertoire. informal used to emphasize something: I've got a whole heap of work to do this afternoon. The new computers are a whole lot (= much) faster.
More examples

whole

whole

noun [C usually singular] uk   /həʊl/ us    /hoʊl/
a complete thing: Two halves make a whole. You must consider each problem as an aspect of the whole.the whole of sth B1 all of something: I'll be on holiday the whole of next week. The whole of his finger was bruised. The whole of the village (= everyone in the village) had come out for the party.
More examples
Translations of “whole”
in Korean 전체의…
in Arabic كامِل…
in French (tout) entier, (en) entier…
in Turkish tüm, bütün, tümü…
in Italian intero, tutto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 全部的, 整個的, 整體的…
in Russian целый, весь…
in Polish cały, w całości…
in Spanish entero, íntegro, todo…
in Portuguese todo, inteiro…
in German ganz…
in Catalan tot, sencer…
in Japanese 全体の, 全部の…
in Chinese (Simplified) 全部的, 整个的, 整体的…
(Definition of whole from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of whole?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “whole” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

luck

the force that causes things, especially good things, to happen to you by chance and not as a result of your own efforts or abilities

Word of the Day

A certain je ne sais quoi: French words and phrases used in English

by Liz Walter,
January 21, 2015
It is an odd irony that the more sophisticated your use of English is, the more likely you are to use French words and phrases. Or, to be more accurate, ones you know to be French – words such as ballet, au pair, abattoir, fiancé, café, and restaurant are so entrenched in

Read More 

flower beard noun

January 19, 2015
a beard adorned with flowers And some of said beard-rockers are even turning it up a notch, painting trend on top of trend with what’s come to be known as ‘the flower beard.’

Read More