win definition, meaning - what is win in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “win”

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win

verb uk   us   /wɪn/ (present participle winning, past tense and past participle won)
A2 [I or T] to achieve first position and/or get a prize in a competition, election, fight, etc.: Which year was it that Italy won the World Cup? He won first prize/a bottle of gin in the raffle. Who's winning? This is the third medal she's won this season. Who won the men's finals in the tennis? They won the war, although it cost them millions of lives. If this government win the next election, I'm leaving the country. Everyone likes winning an argument. [+ two objects] It was his goal that won us the match/won the match for us. Her firm have just won (= beaten other companies to get) a cleaning contract worth £3 million.C2 [T] to receive something positive, such as approval, loyalty, or love because you have earned it: Her plans have won the support of many local people. This is Jamie, the four-year old who won the hearts of the nation (= made everyone love him and/or feel sympathy for him). She would do anything to win his love. Winning back his trust was the hardest part.
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win

noun [C] uk   us   /wɪn/
C1 an occasion when someone wins a game or competition: It was United's sixth consecutive win this season. Everyone was predicting a Republican win at the last election and look what happened.
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(Definition of win from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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