wire Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "wire" - English Dictionary

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wirenoun

uk   /waɪər/  us   /waɪr/

wire noun (METAL THREAD)

B2 [C or U] a piece of thin metal thread that can be bent, used for fastening things and for making particular types of objects that are strong but can bend: a wire fenceB2 [C] (a piece of) thin metal thread with a layer of plastic around it, used for carrying electric current: Someone had cut the phone wires. Don't touch those wires whatever you do.the wire the wire fence round a prison or prison camp : During the war he spent three years behind the wire (= in prison).
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wire noun (MESSAGE)

[C] US informal a telegram

wireverb [T]

uk   /waɪər/  us   /waɪr/

wire verb [T] (METAL THREAD)

to fasten two things together using wire: She had her jaws wired together so that she wouldn't be able to eat. (also wire up) to connect a piece of electrical equipment with wires so that it will work: The stereo wasn't working because it hadn't been wired up properly. Nearly one home in ten across the country is wired up to receive TV via cable.

wire verb [T] (SEND MESSAGE)

to send money using an electrical communication system: The insurance company wired millions of dollars to its accounts to cover the payments. [+ two objects] Luckily my father wired me two hundred bucks. mainly US in the past, to send someone a telegram : Janet wired me to say she'd be here a day later than planned.
(Definition of wire from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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