word Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "word" - English Dictionary

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wordnoun

uk   /wɜːd/  us   /wɝːd/

word noun (LANGUAGE UNIT)

A1 [C] a single unit of language that has meaning and can be spoken or written: Your essay should be no more than two thousand words long. Some words are more difficult to spell than others. What's the word for bikini in French? It's sometimes difficult to find exactly the right word to express what you want to say.the F-word, C-word, etc. used to refer to a word, usually a rude or embarrassing one, by saying only the first letter and not the whole word: You're still not allowed to say the F-word on TV in the US So how's the diet going - or would you rather I didn't mention the d-word?
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word noun (TALKING)

B2 [S] a short discussion or statement: The manager wants a word. Could I have a word (with you) about the sales figures? Perhaps you would have a quiet word with Simon (= gently explain to him) about the problem.words [plural] angry words: Both competitors had words (= argued) after the match. Words passed between both competitors (= they argued) after the match. disapproving discussion, rather than action: I'm afraid so far there have been more words than action on the matter of childcare provision.have/exchange words to talk to each other for a short time: We exchanged a few words as we were coming out of the meeting.a good word a statement of approval and support for someone or something: If you see the captain could you put in a good word for me? The critics didn't have a good word (to say) for/to say about the performance.
More examples
  • Could I have a word with you in private?
  • Incidentally, I wanted to have a word with you about your expenses claim.
  • Can I have a little word with you?
  • When you've got a minute, I'd like a brief word with you.
  • Could I have a quick word ?

word noun (NEWS)

[U] news or a message: Have you had word from Paul since he went to New York? We got word of their plan from a former colleague. Word of the discovery caused a stir among astronomers.

word noun (PROMISE)

[S] a promise: I said I'd visit him and I shall keep my word. You have my word - I won't tell a soul.

word noun (ORDER)

[S] an order: We're waiting for the word from head office before making a statement. The troops will go into action as soon as their commander gives the word. At a word from their teacher, the children started to tidy away their books.

wordverb [T usually + adv/prep]

uk   /wɜːd/  us   /wɝːd/
to choose the words you use when you are saying or writing something: He worded the reply in such a way that he did not admit making the original error.
See also
worded
adjective uk   /ˈwɜː.dɪd/  us   /ˈwɝː-/
a carefully/strongly worded statement
(Definition of word from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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