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English definition of “yet”

yet

adverb uk   /jet/ us  

yet adverb (UNTIL NOW)

A2 still; until the present time: I haven't spoken to her yet. He hasn't finished yet. "Are you ready?" "Not yet - wait a moment." the best, worst, etc. yet B2 the best, worst, etc. until now: Of all the songs I've heard tonight, that's the best yet. as yet C1 formal until and including this time: We haven't needed extra staff as yet, but may do in the future. No ambulances had as yet managed to get across the river.

yet adverb (IN THE FUTURE)

C1 from now and for a particular period of time in the future: She won't be back for a long time yet. Our holiday isn't for weeks yet. have yet to C2 If you have yet to do something, you have not done it: They have yet to make a decision.

yet adverb (EVEN NOW)

C2 even at this stage or time: We could yet succeed - you never know. You might yet prove me wrong. He may win yet.

yet adverb (MORE)

B2 used to add emphasis to words such as another and again, especially to show an increase in amount or the number of times something happens: Rachel bought yet another pair of shoes to add to her collection. I'm sorry to bother you yet again. He's given us yet more work to do.

yet

adverb, conjunction uk   /jet/ us  
B1 (and) despite that; used to add something that seems surprising because of what you have just said: simple yet effective He's overweight and bald, (and) yet somehow, he's attractive.
(Definition of yet from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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