Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “yourself”

See all translations

yourself

pronoun uk   strong /jɔːˈself/ us    /jʊr-/ weak /jə-/  /jɚ-/ ( plural yourselves)

yourself pronoun (PERSON/PEOPLE ADDRESSED)

A2 used when the subject of the verb is "you" or the person being spoken to, and the object is the same person: Be careful with that knife or you'll cut yourself! Katie, control yourself!A2 used for emphasis when the subject is "you": Did you make the dress yourself? You can do that yourself.be yourself to behave in your usual manner, rather than behaving in a way you think other people might like: The best thing you can do is to go into the interview and just be yourself.(all) by yourself A2 alone or without help from anyone else: I'm amazed you managed to move those boxes all by yourself. Do you like being by yourself sometimes or do you get lonely?(all) to yourself for your use only: So you've got the whole house to yourself this weekend?not be/seem/feel yourself not to be, seem, or feel as happy or healthy as usual: Why don't you go home early if you're not feeling yourself?in yourself UK informal used when asking someone about their state of mind when they are physically ill: I know you must still be uncomfortable, but how are you in yourself?
More examples

yourself pronoun (PEOPLE GENERALLY)

B2 used when both the subject and object of the verb are "you" and "you" is also being used to refer to people generally: You tell yourself everything's all right but you know it's not really.
More examples
(Definition of yourself from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of yourself?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “yourself” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

justice

fairness in the way people are dealt with

Word of the Day

A certain je ne sais quoi: French words and phrases used in English

by Liz Walter,
January 21, 2015
It is an odd irony that the more sophisticated your use of English is, the more likely you are to use French words and phrases. Or, to be more accurate, ones you know to be French – words such as ballet, au pair, abattoir, fiancé, café, and restaurant are so entrenched in

Read More 

flower beard noun

January 19, 2015
a beard adorned with flowers And some of said beard-rockers are even turning it up a notch, painting trend on top of trend with what’s come to be known as ‘the flower beard.’

Read More